Monday, November 21, 2016

Aaron Painter

Hallway inside the ship. The circular door is to the airlock/hold where Dr. Aronnax and Ned Land are first kept when taken aboard. I wanted the doorway to feel smaller than the alien crew members to really get across how tall they are when the audience first sees them on screen stepping through the door way.

The planet where the shark/alligator creatures live and where the ship goes to refuel its water supply.

5 comments:

  1. Aaron amazing as always. My only critique is the target between the robot's arm and the darkness of the hallway. But this is a really great base to work with! You could even carry just a snapshot into photoshop and really experiment with some insane color. Good work!

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  2. Good start on your 3D structure/underpainting. Consider the heavy vertical elements, how some of them might be used to indicate structural beams or "ribs" of the Nautilus, and therefore appear to continue above and below the corridor, while the smaller elements can be viewed as local support beams criss-crossing this quadrant of the ship. The round portal will need to be smoothed either in the 3D geo or when you paint over. Also consider the lighting and interior fog, and see if you can use those elements to help cut out the silhouette of your robot/alien figure—assuming you're keeping him in the image for scale. I look forward to seeing this when it's finished.

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  3. Also on your second environment, just a note on the composition. See if you can arrange things more asymmetrically, showing those vertical land forms but perhaps off-center, perhaps with one being cropped off the side of the frame to allow more space toward the middle section of the composition. This helps the viewer mentally "enter" the space, instead of feeling boxed out by having a large shape right in the middle. It might be better to use a horizontal composition, though I imagine you probably chose a vertical (portrait) orientation to emphasize the height of the landforms. But they can appear very high even in a landscape orientation if you place them in perspective, showing your vehicle or figure in contrast. I'd probably place the figures down on a lower place, keep the horizon low, and let the landforms tower above. Some foreground cliff can run right up out of the top of the frame, which lets our imagination estimate it's height.

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  4. I love how you are using Maya for your stuff! The structure inside of the ship is looking great so far. You will probably planned to change this already but make sure when you are finishing your piece have the character do something and not just standing and looking at us. since he is so close up seeing him react in his environment will give us an even better idea of what kind of place the inside of the ship is like. I'm super excited to see this in its final stages!

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  5. Aaron, This is saweet! I like the idea of your second picture better than your first but both are really neat. Justin has a good point about the asymmetry (which I think is its strongest weakness. I would really like to see you bring one of these to more of a finish but I think your 3D skills are going to really help you bring any of these environments to life! Make sure if you do the first picture (hallway) to show what's going on in what you have blacked out, like more robots carrying something through another corridor or a hyper-drive generator or something cool.

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